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OFSTED INSPECTION REPORT 2016

May 26, 2016

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OFSTED INSPECTION REPORT 2016

 

OFSTED INSPECTION REPORT 2016.

 

This newsletter is to inform you about our Ofsted Inspection on the 18th February 2016 and the Inspector’s findings. This was published on Wednesday 9th March 2016 so we can now share our achievements.

 

In June 2015 Ofsted introduced a much tougher inspection framework. This means it is now more difficult to obtain a Good or Outstanding Grade as Ofsted has raised their standards.

 

The Inspector at her feedback was full of praise and found that we are GOOD across all areas with a lot of outstanding practice. We are not outstanding yet because of two minor points; the first one is because our new e-learning journals (Parent’s Zone) is new and not yet fully embedded and the second is the children need to be more vocal and proactive in their own risk assessments.

 

 The reports are now very short but as you read our report below it will become apparent at how well we did. We are very proud of our Inspection Report and I would like to thank my staff for their dedication, commitment and hard work. The report highlights how they have impacted on all the children’s learning and development, which is a testament to their professionalism. I would also like to thank you for your support and encouragement. As a team we are all ensuring that the children meet their full potential.

  • Effectiveness of the Leadership and Management: Good 2

  • Quality of Teaching, Learning and Assessment: Good 2

  • Personal Development, Behaviour and Welfare: Good 2

  • Outcomes for Children: Good 2

Summary of key findings for parents

This provision is GOOD.

  • Management and staff work well together and evaluate their practice critically, in the light of views from parents and children. They continually identify specific areas to develop and make ongoing improvements to ensure children make good progress.

  • Children develop a positive sense of self and start taking responsibility in sharing their ideas. For example, management, staff and children discuss emotions and make decisions about how to behave well, be kind and respect the needs of others.

  • Staff provide an exciting variety of activities that effectively promote children's physical abilities. Children quickly gain good control and coordination in their movements.

  • Management actively supports staff to continue their professional development through ongoing training. For example, staff have developed how they promote children's communication, particularly for those children who are learning English as an additional language.

  • Staff plan purposeful activities based on children's interests and next steps of learning. This effectively builds on children's existing skills and they make good progress.

 

It is not yet Outstanding because:

  • Staff have not fully established systems to provide an accurate check on children's progress.

  • Staff miss some opportunities to encourage children to learn about different ways to keep themselves and others safe from harm.

Inspection Findings.

 

Effectiveness of the leadership and management is GOOD.

Safeguarding is effective. Management and staff regularly update their knowledge of child protection issues and demonstrate a clear understanding of their responsibility in promoting children's welfare. Management implements an effective process of recruitment and employment to continually assess staff suitability. Management constantly reviews policies and procedures to ensure effective organisation. This helps to support staff and parents in meeting and protecting children's needs. For example, there are secure procedures followed for the use of photographs of children in play. Children benefit from the positive partnerships between staff and their parents and other settings they attend. Parents actively contribute to their children's initial assessments and regularly share in their achievements and next steps in learning.

 

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment is GOOD.

Staff actively encourage children's literacy and mathematical skills. For example, preschool children like using their clipboards and start to draw recognisable shapes and letters. They count how many different shapes they see in the play areas and mark these onto a tally chart. Staff effectively support children's curiosity in finding out how things work. For example, toddlers show great interest in pressing buttons to activate lights and music on interactive toys and books. Babies explore the feel and sound of different musical instruments and excitedly shake bells or bang on drums. Older children develop their imagination making delicious breakfasts of pancakes and fruits in the role play area.

 

Personal development, behaviour and welfare are GOOD.

Children are valued and welcomed and staff actively promote inclusion. For instance, they adapt activities to enable each child's participation and achievement at their level of ability. Staff promote children's health and well-being effectively. Children develop good spatial awareness, balance and coordination. For example, babies smile with delight as they eagerly clamber up the steps of a low climbing frame. Toddlers enjoy running freely outside and laugh excitedly as they play hide and seek games with staff. Pre-school children have fun dancing with colourful ribbons, using a rope to climb and learning to take safe risks when jumping from equipment. They talk about the effects on their bodies as they move in different ways. All children enjoy freshly cooked, nutritious meals.

 

Outcomes for children are GOOD

Children make good progress from their starting points. They gain good independence skills from a young age. For example, toddlers start helping to dress themselves and preschool children competently prepare foods for their snack. Children become self-assured communicators. They eagerly join in with activities and gain confidence in their speech and expressing their views. Children are motivated and become critical thinkers, developing key skills needed for their future learning at school.

 

 

Click here to view our full report on the Ofsted website

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